School of Informatics and Computing receives $120K grant from Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust

  • Nov. 24, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

INDIANAPOLIS -- The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI has received a grant totaling $120,000 from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust.

The grant will help fund Informatics: Diversity-Enhanced Workforce, an innovative, year-round, dual-credit multifaceted information technology program that will benefit approximately 180 students for their four-year career at Arsenal Technical, Pike or Providence Cristo Rey high school in Indianapolis.

The program features mentorship, IT certification training, project-based learning and internships to prepare students for interesting, high-paying, in-demand careers in IT fields.

The grant will be used for the first and second years of the program to:

  • Help pay the salary of a School of Informatics and Computing lecturer to teach learning education modules and train the high school teachers.
  • Help purchase tablets for students to use and keep.
  • Help cover the costs of a professional program evaluator.

Informatics: Diversity-Enhanced Workforce addresses the critical shortage of skilled workers in IT as well as the dramatically low number of blacks, Latinos, women and other underrepresented groups working in the IT sector.

"There are over 1.4 million unfilled jobs in the IT industry, and the number continues to grow," said Mathew Palakal, executive associate dean of the School of Informatics and Computing. "These jobs are high-paying and available all over the United States. We feel a sense of responsibility to assist with the preparation of the workforce of the future."

During her career, Nina Mason Pulliam shared her financial success and business-leadership skills with many charities. She was particularly sensitive to human needs, animal welfare and environmental issues. "She had a keen awareness of challenges that face our community and would take great pride in the outstanding work being done by organizations like the IU School of Informatics and Computing," said Carol Schilling, trustee chair. "Through her trust, we continue to build on her legacy, which clearly reflects her heart for philanthropy."

The grant to the School of Informatics and Computing represents one of 27 awarded to nonprofit organizations in Indiana by the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust during the second of two grant cycles this year.

Since the trust began its grant-making in 1998, it has awarded more than $252 million to nonprofit organizations in Indiana and Arizona. As of Sept. 30, the trust had assets of approximately $364 million.

Richard Schneider
Stacy  Zearing